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Adolescent research has traditionally focused on adolescent adjustment outcomes in the context of interparental conflict, rather than jointly examining predictive relationships between adolescent adjustment and the interparental dynamic. Given that sub-systems within the family are interwoven in reciprocal relationships, examination of these more complex pathways serves to inform developmental research in both the areas of adolescent adjustment and family wellbeing. Utilizing a family systems framework, this narrative review examines bidirectional pathways, including adolescent psychological adjustment effects on interparental conflict and conflict-driven effects on adolescent adjustment. In doing so, the lifespan and contextual factors of parenting an adolescent are examined, for which evidence suggests that pubertal development of the adolescent, adolescent adjustment, and the lifespan timing of interparental relationships may pose unique risks for interparental conflict. Interparental conflict pathways exacerbating adolescent internalizing and externalizing problems are also examined.

Among boys who made negative conflict appraisals, interparental conflict predicted greater use of conflict engagement, physical aggression, and withdrawal and less positive affect.

Interparental Conflict and Adolescent Dating Relationships: Integrating Cognitive, Emotional, and Peer Influences. Article ( Available) in Journal of Family Psychology 18(3) October. Kinsfogel KM, Grych JH. Interparental conflict and adolescent dating relationships: Integrating cognitive, emotional, and peer influences. Journal of Family Psychology. ; - [Google Scholar] Kurdek L. Predicting change in marital satisfaction from husbands' and wives' conflict resolution styles. Journal of Marriage and the Family. In line with the cognitive-contextual framework proposed by Grych and Fincham , evidence suggests that children exposed to interparental conflict (IPC) are at risk for experiencing conflict within their own intimate relationships. The mediating role of adolescent appraisal in the relation between IPC and adolescent dating behavior was examined in the current thatliz.com by:

In contrast, interparental conflict was associated with less use of conflict engagement and more initiation of positive exchange among girls who make negative conflict appraisals. We had originally hypothesized that this dynamic would be manifested by compliance.

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Although this pattern emerged, it was not specific to girls. The extent to which such behavior encourages positive outcomes or incurs psychosocial costs e.

The role of emotion socialization in shaping these behavioral patterns is an important area for future investigation. Self-blaming appraisals may lead to fear of retribution, and appraisals of threat may reflect fears of physical or psychological harm.

May 30,   Interparental Conflict and Adolescent Dating Relationships Kerri L. Kim, Yo Jackson, Heather L. Hunter, and Selby M. Conrad Journal of Interpersonal Violence 5, Cited by: Adolescent research has traditionally focused on adolescent adjustment outcomes in the context of interparental conflict, rather than jointly examining predictive relationships between adolescent adjustment and the interparental dynamic. Given that sub-systems within the family are interwoven in reciprocal relationships, examination of these more complex pathways serves to inform . Interparental conflict and adolescent dating relationships: the role of perceived threat and self-blame appraisals. Kim KL(1), Jackson Y, Hunter HL, Conrad SM. Cited by:

If true, girls with negative conflict appraisals may be more likely associate interparental conflict with danger or defenselessness. The only moderated effect that was not gender specific was compliance. Interparental conflict was associated with more use of compliance for all adolescents who made more negative conflict appraisals.

Although this style could serve to circumvent some conflict, it may result in less intimate and satisfying relationships Simon et al.

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Yet several limitations need to be considered when interpreting the results. Intuitively, this seems most plausible but the data are correlational, and the effects could be in the other direction, bi-directional, or reflect a third unmeasured variable. Although we assessed numerous conflict tactics, our list was not exhaustive, and other conflict behaviors merit attention. Hence, it is possible that a greater number of findings emerged for boys than girls in the current study because the conflict dimensions assessed were more salient for boys than girls.

Sample characteristics may limit the generalization of our findings. First, all participants were heterosexual.

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In addition, we studied intact families, most of whom were biological parents. Further research is needed to examine adoptive or blended family contexts as well as the effects of parental divorce. Lastly, the recruitment of participants through advertisements and home mailings could have biased sample selection in ways that could limit the external validity of the findings. Another potential limitation of the current study concerns the use of adolescent report to assess both interparental and romantic relationship conflict, which could have inflated associations among the constructs.

Similar concerns regarding mono-method informant bias may also limit e interpretation of the moderated effects. The sheer number of correlational analyses increases the possibility of Type I errors; but the pattern of significant results was consistent and readily interpretable.

Overall, the presence of links between interparental conflict and romantic relationship conflict during adolescence is noteworthy. Longitudinal studies are required to determine how these associations unfold over time. Alternatively, they could become weaker as individuals acquire more direct experience in addressing conflicts in romantic relationships.

Interparental Con?ict and Adolescent Dating Relationships: Integrating Cognitive, Emotional, and Peer In?uences Kristen M. Kinsfogel and John H. Grych. CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): This study investigated the ways in which exposure to interparental conflict may affect adolescent dating relationships in a sample of adolescents ages 14 to 18 years. Boys exposed to greater parental discord were more likely to view aggression as justifiable in a romantic relationship, had more difficulty. This study investigated the ways in which exposure to interparental conflict may affect adolescent dating relationships in a sample of adolescents ages 14 to 18 years. Boys exposed to greater parental discord were more likely to view aggression as justifiable in a romantic relationship, had more difficulty managing anger, and believed that.

Simon, P. Furman, P. We would like to thank MaryFrances Porter for her co-ordination of the data collection and Rachel Derrington for her assistance in coding the videotapes.

Thanks also go to the participating adolescents, families, and schools. Valerie A. National Center for Biotechnology InformationU.

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J Res Adolesc. Author manuscript; available in PMC Jan 1.

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SimonPh. Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer. Copyright notice. See other articles in PMC that cite the published article.

Adolescent Gender Davies and Lindsay have argued that differences in gender socialization could lead boys and girls to react differently to interparental conflict. Procedure Participants were recruited from two school districts of a large Western metropolitan city through advertisements in school newspapers and letters sent to families of high school seniors in these schools. Results Preliminary Analyses Associations between demographic variables and the dependent variables were examined.

Descriptive Information Means and standard deviations for each measure are presented in Table 1 for the entire sample as well as by gender. Open in a separate window. Interparental Conflict IPC Negative Appraisals of IPC. Romantic Relationship Conflict. Aggressive Style. Engaging Style. Compliant Style.

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Withdrawing Style. Observed Communication. Observed Conflict. Observed Positive Expression. Figure 1.

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Figure 2. Observed interactions with romantic partners Table 4 presents the results of analyses predicting the quality of observed interactions for the subset of 88 adolescents who participated in the observation session with their romantic partner. Contributor Information Valerie A. Multiple regression: Testing and interpreting interactions.

London: Sage; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

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The moderator-mediator variable distinction in social psychological research: Conceptual, strategic, and statistical considerations. Journal of Family Psychology.

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Competence in early adult romantic relationships: A developmental perspective on family influences. Psychological Bulletin. Effects of marital conflict on children: Recent advances and emerging themes in process-oriented research. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. Marital conflict, gender, and children's appraisals and coping efficacy as mediators of child adjustment.

Interparental conflict and adolescent adjustment: Why does gender moderate early adolescent vulnerability? Adult conflict history and children's subsequent responses to conflict: An experimental test.

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Interparental discord and adolescent adjustment trajectories: The potentiating and protective role of intrapersonal attributes.

Child Development. Intergenerational transmission of partner violence: A year prospective study. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. Appraisals of marital conflict and children's adjustment, health, and physiological reactivity. Developmental Psychology.

Exposure to interparental conflict and children's adjustment and physical health: The moderating role of vagal tone. Children's perceptions of marital discord and behavior problems of boys and girls. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. European Psychologist. In line with the cognitive-contextual framework proposed by Grych and Finchamevidence suggests that children exposed to interparental conflict IPC are at risk for experiencing conflict within their own intimate relationships.

The mediating role of adolescent appraisal in the relation between IPC and adolescent dating behavior was examined in the current study. Specifically, it was hypothesized that self-blame and threat appraisals would mediate the relation between IPC and adolescent maladaptive dating behaviors. Findings suggest that self-blame appraisal partially mediated the relation between IPC and adolescent sexual aggression, and between IPC and adolescent threatening behavior. Abstract Read article for free, via Unpaywall a legal, open copy of the full text.

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Kinsfogel KM. Grych JH. Affiliations All authors 1. A comment on this article appears in " Gaining a better understanding of peer group contributions to dating aggression-implications for prevention and intervention programming: comment on kinsfogel and grych Share this article Share with email Share with twitter Share with linkedin Share with facebook.

Boys exposed to greater parental discord were more likely to view aggression as justifiable in a romantic relationship, had more difficulty managing anger, and believed that aggressive behavior was more common in their peers' dating relationships.

Interparental conflict and adolescent dating relationships

Each of these variables in turn linked witnessing interparental conflict to higher levels of verbal and physical aggression toward their own romantic partners. Interparental conflict was not related to girls' aggressive behavior.

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These data support the value of targeting cognitive and emotional processes in prevention programs designed to reduce dating violence and suggest that such programs will be strengthened by focusing on peer influences as well. Dating violence among high school students. Bergman Soc Work. Predictors of dating violence: A multivariate analysis.

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Bookwala Violence Vict. Aggression toward female partners by at-risk young men: the contribution of male adolescent friendships. Romantic relationships in adolescence: The role of friends and peers in their emergence and development.

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The role of emotion and emotional regulation in children's responses to interparental conflict. Marital conflict and child adjustment: an emotional security hypothesis. Show 10 more references 10 of Smart citations by scite. The number of the statements may be higher than the number of citations provided by EuropePMC if one paper cites another multiple times or lower if scite has not yet processed some of the citing articles.



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